Category Archives: Awards

Milestones | Awards, Personnel News, Promotions

Awarded:

C. David Allis, the 2015 Breakthrough Prize in Life Sciences. The award recognizes Dr. Allis “for the discovery of covalent modifications of histone proteins and their critical roles in the regulation of gene expression and chromatin organization, advancing the understanding of diseases ranging from birth defects to cancer.” The Breakthrough Prize, worth $3 million, was launched in 2013 by a group of Internet and technology entrepreneurs to recognize transformative advances toward understanding living systems and extending human life. Dr. Allis is one of six scientists to receive the life sciences prize this year; the awards were presented at a celebrity-studded gala awards ceremony November 9 at NASA’s Ames Research Center in Mountain View, California. Dr. Allis is Joy and Jack Fishman Professor and head of the Laboratory of Chromatin Biology and Epigenetics.

Milestones | Awards, Personnel News, Promotions

Awarded:

Elaine Fuchs, the 2012 Academy Medal for Distinguished Contributions in Biomedical Science from the New York Academy of Medicine, for her innovative and imaginative approaches to research in skin biology, its stem cells and its associated human genetic disorders. The medal is given to eminent scientists in biomedicine, particularly those with a special interest in translating research findings to advance human health. Dr. Fuchs is the Rebecca C. Lancefield Professor and head of the Laboratory of Mammalian Cell Biology and Development.

Milestones | Awards, Personnel News, Promotions

Awarded:


C. David Allis, a grant from the Caring for Carcinoid Foundation, for research on tumor suppressor activities of ATRX and Daxx mutations through epigenomic profiling and animal models. Dr. Allis, the Joy and Jack Fishman Professor and head of the Laboratory of Chromatin Biology and Epigenetics, will collaborate with scientists at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center on the $450,000, two-year project.

Teaching awards honor Brivanlou and Fuchs | Awards

teachingawards2Ali H. Brivanlou, head of the Laboratory of Molecular Vertebrate Embryology, and Elaine Fuchs, head of the Laboratory of Mammalian Cell Biology and Development, were this year’s recipients of Distinguished Teaching Awards. The awards were established in 2005 to recognize outstanding individual contributions to the university’s educational environment, and include a plaque and a monetary gift.

Milestones | Awards, Personnel News, Promotions

Awarded:

Jesse H. Ausubel, the 2012 National Ocean Champion Award, presented by the Urban Coast Institute of Monmouth University in New Jersey, for his contributions to marine science and management. Mr. Ausubel joins a distinguished group of awardees, including Jean-Michel Cousteau, who won in 2011. He is the director and senior research associate of the Program for the Human Environment.

Milestones | Awards, Personnel News, Promotions

Awarded:

Elaine Fuchs, the 2012 March of Dimes Prize in Developmental Biology. The prize, which Dr. Fuchs shares with Howard Green of Harvard Medical School, was established in 1996 as a tribute to the pioneering virologist Jonas Salk, and recognizes leaders in the field of developmental biology who offer hope for the prevention and treatments of some of the most serious birth defects and other human diseases. It consists of a $250,000 award and a silver medal in the design of the Roosevelt dime. Dr. Fuchs is Rebecca C. Lancefield Professor and head of the Laboratory of Mammalian Cell Biology and Development.

Milestones | Awards, Personnel News, Promotions

Leslie B. Vosshall, the 2011 Gill Young Investigator Award from the Linda and Jack Gill Center for Biomolecular Science at Indiana University, Bloomington. The award recognizes exceptional scientists who have emerged as international leaders in cellular, membrane or molecular neuroscience. Dr. Vosshall is Robin Chemers Neustein Professor and head of the Laboratory of Neurogenetics and Behavior, as well as a Howard Hughes Medical Institute investigator.

Pearl Meister Greengard Prize to be awarded to McGill memory researcher | Awards

milnerIn the early 1950s, Brenda Milner was making a name for herself among researchers in the memory field, studying memory defects in epileptic patients who had undergone surgery on the brain’s frontal lobe. By 1955, Dr. Milner’s work attracted the attention of a Connecticut neurosurgeon, William Scoville, whose patient, known by his initials H.M., suffered severe memory loss after having parts of the temporal lobe on both sides of his brain removed to treat severe epilepsy. The surgery rendered H.M. unable to form any new memories, although his personality was unchanged and he retained all memories of what happened in his life before the operation.

Milestones | Awards, Personnel News, Promotions

Awarded:

Cori Bargmann, the 11th Perl-University of North Carolina Neuroscience Prize. The award, which Dr. Bargmann shares with Catherine Dulac of Harvard, is worth $10,000 and is awarded this year for the discovery of chemosensory circuits that regulate social behaviors. Dr. Bargmann, Torsten N. Wiesel Professor, head of the Lulu and Anthony Wang Laboratory of Neural Circuits and Behavior and a Howard Hughes Medical Institute investigator, will deliver her prize lecture at the UNC Neuroscience Symposium on October 13.

Milestones | Awards, Personnel News, Promotions

Awarded:

Titia de Lange, the 2011 Vilcek Prize in Biomedical Science. The $100,000 prize recognizes her body of research on mechanisms that help maintain genome stability, in particular on telomeres, the elements that protect chromosome ends from unnecessary repair and mediate their replication. This work has led to a greater understanding of how telomeres protect chromosome ends, and what happens when telomere function is lost during the early stages of tumorigenesis. Dr. de Lange is Leon Hess Professor and head of the Laboratory of Cell Biology and Genetics. She will receive the prize at the Vilcek Foundation’s annual awards presentation dinner in New York City in April.

Milestones | Awards, Personnel News, Promotions

C. David Allis, the 2011 Lewis S. Rosenstiel Award for Distinguished Work in Basic Medical Science from Brandeis University. He shares the prize with Michael Grunstein, a professor of biological chemistry in the Geffen School of Medicine and the Molecular Biology Institute at UCLA, for establishing “the key molecular connections between histones, histone modifications and chromatin structure and their effect on the regulation of gene transcription.” The award will be presented at Brandeis on April 14, 2011. Dr. Allis is the Joy and Jack Fishman Professor and head of the Laboratory of Chromatin Biology and Epigenetics.

2010 Pearl Meister Greengard Prize awarded to pioneers of cancer genetics | Awards

greengard2010Janet Davison Rowley and Mary-Claire King, pioneering cancer geneticists, are the recipients of the 2010 Pearl Meister Greengard Prize awarded by The Rockefeller University. Created to recognize the accomplishments of outstanding female scientists, the $100,000 prize was presented at a ceremony in Caspary Auditorium on November 16.

Jeff Friedman receives Lasker Award for discovery of leptin | Awards

2007_DSC_5502approved_cJeffrey M. Friedman, who first came to Rockefeller as a postdoc in 1980 and has been head of laboratory since 1991, is one of two recipients of this year’s Albert Lasker Award for Basic Medical Research, considered the most prestigious American prize in science. The Lasker award recognized him for his “discovery of leptin, a hormone that regulates appetite and body weight, a breakthrough that opened obesity research to molecular exploration.” He is the 21st Lasker recipient associated with the university.

Milestones | Awards, Personnel News, Promotions

Jean-Laurent Casanova, a Grand Challenges Explorations grant from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation. The $100,000 grant is one of 78 announced by the foundation in May to support scientists exploring bold and largely unproven ways to improve health in developing countries. Dr. Casanova is head of the St. Giles Laboratory of Human Genetics of Infectious Diseases.

Teresa Davoli awarded David Rockefeller Fellowship | Awards

davoliTeresa Davoli has had a powerful interest in cancer biology since high school, when she started scouring books on the subject. She’s inspired by efforts to find treatments for the deadly diseases that target specific molecular interactions, as opposed to the relatively blunt carpet bombing of chemotherapy. Ms. Davoli is pursuing that aim as a member of Titia de Lange’s Laboratory of Cell Biology and Genetics. For her research accomplishments and contributions off campus as well, she was awarded this year’s David Rockefeller Fellowship.

Teaching awards honor Gilbert and Rice | Awards

gilbertCharles D. Gilbert, head of the Laboratory of Neurobiology, and Charles M. Rice, head of the Laboratory of Virology and Infectious Disease, were the recipients of this year’s Rockefeller University Distinguished Teaching Awards. Established in 2005 to recognize outstanding individual contributions to the university’s educational environment, the teaching awards are presented each year to one or two faculty members. Chosen by a committee that includes the university’s scientific executive officers, awardees receive a plaque and a monetary gift. Dr. Gilbert teaches a course on neural systems that covers mechanisms of information processing in the adult nervous system at the level of neuronal ensembles and interactions.

Martin Rees is 2009 Lewis Thomas Prize winner | Awards

lewthomas2For as long as humans have gazed at the night sky, we have questioned our place in the universe and how and where it all began. Martin Rees, the celebrated British cosmologist and astrophysicist, has chronicled scientists’ speculations about the cosmos through seven volumes of popular science. On April 26, President Paul Nurse presented Dr. Rees with the 2009 Lewis Thomas Prize for Writing about Science. The prize recognizes Dr. Rees’s 2000 publication Just Six Numbers: The Deep Forces that Shape the Universe.

Milestones | Awards, Personnel News, Promotions

Awarded:

Nam-Hai Chua
, the Lawrence Bogorad Award for Excellence in Plant Biology Research from the American Society of Plant Biologists. Dr. Chua, Andrew W. Mellon Professor and head of the Laboratory of Plant Molecular Biology, is honored for his development of fundamental tools essential to conducting molecular research in plants. The Bogorad Award is awarded biennially to a plant scientist whose work “both illuminates the present and suggests paths to enlighten the future.”

Milestones | Awards, Personnel News, Promotions

Paul Bieniasz, the 2010 Eli Lilly and Company Research Award from the American Society for Microbiology, the society’s oldest and most prestigious prize. Dr. Bieniasz, head of Rockefeller’s Laboratory of Retrovirology and an investigator at the Aaron Diamond AIDS Research Center and the Howard Hughes Medical Institute, is recognized for his work elucidating the mechanisms of virus-host interaction in HIV infection.

Pearl Meister Greengard Prize honors Australian geneticist | Awards, Honors

by TALLEY HENNING BROWN

Paul Greengard, Ursula von Rydingsvard, Suzanne Cory, Wafaa El-Sadr and Paul NurseWomen’s work. From left, Paul Greengard, Ursula von Rydingsvard, Suzanne Cory, Wafaa El-Sadr and Paul Nurse.

This year’s Pearl Meister Greengard Prize recognizes Suzanne Cory, an Australian geneticist whose work has included significant revelations about the workings of the immune system and the pathogenesis of cancer. President Paul Nurse presented Dr. Cory with the prize, the sixth annual award, at a ceremony in Caspary Auditorium on November 5. More

Milestones | Awards, Personnel News, Promotions

Awarded:

Michael Crickmore, Grand Prize in the 2009 GE & Science Prize for Young Life Scientists, an essay competition. Dr. Crickmore, a postdoctoral fellow in Leslie B. Vosshall’s Laboratory of Neurogenetics and Behavior, won for his essay titled “The Molecular Basis of Size Differences,” based on graduate work he completed at Columbia University. More

Environmental health and safety program wins award | Awards, Honors

by TALLEY HENNING BROWN

The Office of Laboratory Safety and Environmental Health members
On the safe side. The Office of Laboratory Safety and Environmental Health, from left to right: James Gugluzza, Amy Wilkerson, Anthony Santoro, Rebecca Lonergan, Frank Schaefer, Anthony Harper, Gaitree McNab, Beth Fitzgerald and Elsie Calo.

Probing the depths of human disease often means being up close and personal with hazardous materials. Even so, Rockefeller University has been named one of the safest campuses in the country. In New Orleans this July, Amy Wilkerson, associate vice president for research support, accepted on behalf of The Rockefeller University an Award of Honor from the Campus Safety, Health and Environmental Management Association (CSHEMA). One of only two such awards conferred this year, the honor recognizes the university’s comprehensive safety program.

Established in 1954, CSHEMA is the leading professional environmental health and safety organization for the college and university sector. As part of its mission to encourage creative problem solving and address emerging health and safety challenges among member institutions, CSHEMA instituted its awards program in 1972. Applicant institutions are evaluated on a point system; the Award of Honor, which requires a score of 90 percent or higher, is CSHEMA’s highest. Rockefeller University, a member since the early 1980s, applied for the first time this year. More

Alumnus Robert Sapolsky honored with 2008 Lewis Thomas Prize | Awards, Honors

by TALLEY HENNING BROWN

Robert SapolskyIt is a rare child who dreams of growing up to be a mountain gorilla. When, for young Robert Morris Sapolsky, such lofty aspirations proved less than feasible, he decided on the next most exciting life — becoming a scientist. Upon graduating with a Ph.D. from The Rockefeller University in 1984, Dr. Sapolsky began what would become a lifelong, passionate pursuit studying the baboons of the East African Serengeti Plain. The fruit of that labor, a book aptly titled A Primate’s Memoir: A Neuroscientist’s Unconventional Life Among the Baboons, has won numerous awards. At a ceremony in Caspary Auditorium on June 2, Rockefeller added to the acclaim with the 2008 Lewis Thomas Prize for Writing about Science. More

Milestones | Awards, Personnel News, Promotions

Awarded:

Sreekanth H. Chalasani and Shai Shaham, finalists in the 2009 Blavatnik Awards for Young Scientists. Dr. Chalasani, a postdoc in Cori Bargmann’s Laboratory of Neural Circuits and Behavior, will receive a grant of $5,000. Dr. Shaham, head of the Laboratory of Developmental Genetics, will receive $10,000. The competition winners, who will receive additional funds, will be announced at the New York Academy of Sciences’ annual Science and the City gala on November 16. More

Telomerase researchers honored with Pearl Meister Greengard Prize | Awards, Honors

by TALLEY HENNING BROWN

2008 Pearl Meister Greengard Prize recipients Vicki Lundblad, Carol W. Greider and Elizabeth H. Blackburn
Defenders of DNA. From left to right, the 2008 Pearl Meister Greengard Prize recipients Vicki Lundblad, Carol W. Greider and Elizabeth H. Blackburn.

The Pearl Meister Greengard Prize, Rockefeller University’s annual award for outstanding women in science, was presented this year to three scientists who together established the field of telomerase research. Elizabeth H. Blackburn of the University of California, San Francisco, Carol W. Greider of The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and Vicki Lundblad of the Salk Institute for Biological Studies have elucidated how telomeres, which protect the integrity of chromosomes, are themselves protected by the enzyme telomerase. The women’s pathbreaking achievements were honored at a ceremony in Caspary Auditorium on March 26. More

A celebration of service | Awards, Honors

In 2008, 10 people retired and two celebrated anniversaries of service to The Rockefeller University. At a dinner in the Abby Aldrich Rockefeller Dining Hall on April 16, those 12 people were honored for their contribution to the university community. More

Milestones | Awards, Personnel News, Promotions

Awarded:

Nadya Dimitrova, a 2009 Harold M. Weintraub Graduate Student Award from the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center. One of 13 awardees, Ms. Dimitrova was chosen for her work on repair mechanisms of double-strand breaks. The award offers an honorarium to advanced graduate students for the quality, originality and significance of their thesis research. Ms. Dimitrova, who is a graduate student in Titia de Lange’s Laboratory of Cell Biology and Genetics, will participate in a scientific symposium at the Hutchinson Center in Seattle on May 1.
More

Milestones | Awards, Personnel News, Promotions

Awarded:

Laura A. Banaszynski, the Angelo Family Fellowship of the Damon Runyon Cancer Research Foundation. Dr. Banaszynski, postdoc in C. David Allis’s Laboratory of Chromatin Biology and Epigenetics, is investigating how histone modifications regulate gene expression and maintain genome stability, work that could have significant implications for cancer diagnosis and therapeutics. Dr. Banaszynski is one of 16 postodoctoral fellows named by the foundation this year. More

A millennium of service | Awards, Honors

A dinner in Weiss honors 2007 retirements and anniversaries.

2007 was a milestone year for many at Rockefeller University. Twenty employees celebrated anniversaries and 16 people retired. The honorees of this year’s banquet, held in the Weiss Café on April 17, represent nearly 1,200 years of service to The Rockefeller University. More

Pearl Meister Greengard Prize honors pioneers of embryonic stem cell research | Awards, Honors

by TALLEY HENNING BROWN

PMG Prize WinnersThree pioneers of embryonic stem cell research — an embryologist, a molecular geneticist and a developmental biologist — are the recipients of the 2007 Pearl Meister Greengard Prize, the university’s award for notable women in science. The award, presented in a ceremony in Caspary Auditorium on March 25, recognized Gail Martin of the University of California, San Francisco, Beatrice Mintz of Fox Chase Cancer Center and Elizabeth Robertson, from the University of Oxford. More

Milestones | Awards, Personnel News, Promotions

Awarded:

C. David Allis, the 2008 ASBMB-Merck Award, from the American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology. The award, which includes $5,000, recognizes outstanding contributions to research in biochemistry and molecular biology. Dr. Allis, head of the Laboratory of Chromatin Biology and Epigenetics, will receive the award and present a lecture at the ASBMB annual meeting in San Diego, California, in April. More

Following in family’s footsteps, Alicia Darnell wins national science prize | Awards, Honors

by TALLEY HENNING BROWN

Darnell_family

Family tradition. Alicia Darnell having tea with her family (from left, Jennifer, Bob and Jim) in Paul Nurse’s office in December.

For Alicia Darnell, science fairs are serious business. After two summers spent in research laboratories, the high school senior took home more than just extra credit — Ms. Darnell is this year’s second-place winner in the national Siemens Competition in Math, Science and Technology. The daughter of Associate Research Professor Jennifer Darnell and Professor Robert Darnell and the granddaughter of Professor Emeritus James Darnell Jr., Ms. Darnell — herself a former Science Outreach student — represents the third generation of Rockefeller University scientists in her family. Her project, titled “Alternative Splicing Defects Linked to Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS),” garnered her a $50,000 scholarship. The award was announced December 3 at New York University. More

Milestones | Awards, Personnel News, Promotions

Awarded:

Lu Bai, postdoc in Frederick Cross’s Laboratory of Yeast Molecular Genetics, and Erik Debler, postdoc in Günter Blobel’s Laboratory of Cell Biology, 2007 Damon Runyon Fellowships from the Damon Runyon Cancer Research Foundation. The three-year award recognizes outstanding postdocs conducting innovative basic and translational cancer research. Dr. Bai is investigating key features in promoter architecture and chromatin structure that govern the transcription of cell cycle regulated genes. Dr. Debler is researching core structures of the nuclear pore complex (NPC). Chromosomal translocations of NPC proteins are linked to various types of cancer, including myeloid and lymphoid leukemias. More

Milestones | Awards, Personnel News, Promotions

Awarded:

Dirk Albrecht, Maria Neimark Geffen and Jan Skotheim, 2008 Burroughs Wellcome Fund Career Awards at the Scientific Interface. The grants, which come with $500,000 each over five years, are designed to foster the early career advancement of researchers with backgrounds in the physical and/or computational sciences whose work addresses biological questions. Dr. Albrecht is a postdoc in the Bargmann lab; Dr. Geffen is a fellow at the Center for Studies in Physics and Biology; and Dr. Skotheim is a postdoc in the Siggia lab. More

Milestones | Awards, Personnel News, Promotions

Awarded:

Sean Brady, a 2007 Beckman Young Investigator Award, for his work in the discovery and study of naturally occurring small molecules and their therapeutic potential. The award, which comes with a grant of approximately $300,000, was established in 1991 by the Arnold and Mabel Beckman Foundation to acknowledge the contributions of tenure-track scientists in the early stage of their research careers.
More

A salute to dedication | Awards, Honors

Banquet honors those who retired or reached major milestones in 2006

fisheye-banquet_3
The 10 individuals honored at the anniversary and retirement dinner on May 2 have collectively dedicated more than 300 years of service to The Rockefeller University. Add the people honored at the employee recognition reception on May 16, and it’s nearly a millennium. More

Lewis Thomas Prize awarded to Richard Dawkins | Awards, Honors

by TALLEY HENNING BROWN

Richard Dawkins and Paul NurseThe committee that nominates and selects recipients of the Lewis Thomas Prize does not have an easy job; few people eloquently straddle the fields of science and literature. But there was little debate over Richard Dawkins, British ethologist and popular science writer, who was presented with the 2006 Lewis Thomas Prize for Writing about Science April 24. More